Women, Conflict and Peace: Learning from Kismayo

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Peace Direct, the Life & Peace Institute and the Somali Women Solidarity Organization have produced a report following research conducted in Kismayo, a port city in the Jubaland region of Somalia, into the roles of women in conflict and building peace. The findings deepen our understanding of how Somali women play an instrumental role in the construction, prosecution and resolution of violent intra and inter-clan conflict. Whilst focusing on the context of Kismayo, this report brings with it reflections which are relevant within the Somali context, and also for wider dynamics regarding women’s role in peacebuilding; an important assessment of how women construct pathways to peace.

Alongside the report, a compilation of ‘life stories’ from women who were interviewed through the research provides first-person experiences of the Somali civil war. Delving into women’s collected memories, we hear reflections on the roles women play in conflict, and the importance of women’s peace activism and political ambition.

Photo: Social-life and Agricultural Development Organization 

Report

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Life stories

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