Kakule’s Story

This is Kakule Wassi’s story. Kakule had the choice to join a local militia group, before being given the opportunity to get involved in vocational training run by our local partner Centre Résolution Conflits. Now, he feels well accepted and valued in the community.

My name is Kakule Wassi. I’m 14 years old. I’ve been attending a locally run vocational training centre for the last seven months. I’m learning skills to build motorbikes and to repair bicycles. This has had a very positive impact on my life. It has changed my mind about joining local militia groups.

 This vocational training centre has had a very positive impact on my life.

I know of a few young boys from my village who have joined a local militia group and told me many things about joining the armed group, they eat well every day, steal goats from villagers and drink alcoholic drinks when they want.

I almost joined.

Then we learned the leader had been arrested by the government, and we then didn’t have any clear direction to follow. That’s the moment we heard about this CRC project and the opportunity to gain valuable knowledge to allow us to start a new life. We had two choices: enroll in the militia or get involved in vocational training to stay out of reach of the militia. I chose the second option.

 We had two choices: enroll in the militia or get involved in vocational training to stay out of reach of the militia. I chose the second option.

During the first few months in the vocational training centre we received life skills support. They taught us about the rules of conduct in society, how to behave when with adults and our own parents so we can easily become active members of the community again.

So far, I feel well accepted and valued in the community. I’m very thankful for this programme. It has made such a difference to my life.

 I feel well accepted and valued in the community…It has made such a difference to my life.

 

To read more about the work of our local partner CRC, and the other organisations we supported in 2017, explore our Impact Report.

 

Photos used are representative. Credit: Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi

 

 

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